…and since it’s been so long since I posted, I decided to give you guys a double dose of fun, for tonight’s surprise second post is Game & Watch Gallery 3! Like both predecessors, this version of Game & Watch Gallery features another onslaught of games from the Game & Watch period of Nintendo’s history with modern Mario style updates, and like Game & Watch Gallery 2, it features color palates for use in the Gmaeboy Color.
     The games featured in this installment are Egg, Greenhouse, Turtle Bridge, Mario Bros., and Donkey Kong Jr. Also, the game features six unlockable games, Judge, Flagman, Lion, Spitball Sparky, Donkey Kong II, and Fire which happen to only be playable in classic mode.
     In Egg, the classic mode gives the player the role of a wolf/fox(?) who is at the end of the ramps connected to four chicken coops and has to catch eggs as they roll down. In the modern, however, the player is Yoshi and is to catch rolling cookies with his tongue from four rolling hills. In Greenhouse, the player is to prevent pests from destroying the plans in a greenhouse, Shy Guys in modern and spiders in classic, whether you’re Yoshi or the pest control guy, you must protect the plants as best you can. In Turtle Bridge, the player attempts to jump across a row of turtles on top of the ocean to bring equipment from one island to another watching his or her step as turtles sometimes dive to catch fish deeper in the water than the player can survive. The same goes for the modern version of the game, except that the player is Toad and is jumping across a row of goonies from Yoshi’s Island in order to cart mushrooms from Mario to Princess Peach. In Mario Bros., the player operates two persons at the end of multiple conveyer belts connected by ladders who’s purpose is to make sure that items being shipped out make it to the higher conveyer belt which, while in no way resembles the enemy flipping Mario Bros. arcade game, the player does get to use the Mario Brothers in modern mode to move the packages. In Donkey Kong Jr., which actually plays like its NES counterpart, the player takes the role of Donkey Kong Jr. who is on a quest to save Donkey Kong from the clutches of Mario who has captured and put into a cage. DK Jr. progresses through the level in order to find the key while avoiding enemies and eventually making it to his father’s cage. The classic mode is essentially the same, but is much harder due to increased enemy presence.
-Released December 1st, 1999

…and since it’s been so long since I posted, I decided to give you guys a double dose of fun, for tonight’s surprise second post is Game & Watch Gallery 3! Like both predecessors, this version of Game & Watch Gallery features another onslaught of games from the Game & Watch period of Nintendo’s history with modern Mario style updates, and like Game & Watch Gallery 2, it features color palates for use in the Gmaeboy Color.

     The games featured in this installment are Egg, Greenhouse, Turtle Bridge, Mario Bros., and Donkey Kong Jr. Also, the game features six unlockable games, Judge, Flagman, Lion, Spitball Sparky, Donkey Kong II, and Fire which happen to only be playable in classic mode.

     In Egg, the classic mode gives the player the role of a wolf/fox(?) who is at the end of the ramps connected to four chicken coops and has to catch eggs as they roll down. In the modern, however, the player is Yoshi and is to catch rolling cookies with his tongue from four rolling hills. In Greenhouse, the player is to prevent pests from destroying the plans in a greenhouse, Shy Guys in modern and spiders in classic, whether you’re Yoshi or the pest control guy, you must protect the plants as best you can. In Turtle Bridge, the player attempts to jump across a row of turtles on top of the ocean to bring equipment from one island to another watching his or her step as turtles sometimes dive to catch fish deeper in the water than the player can survive. The same goes for the modern version of the game, except that the player is Toad and is jumping across a row of goonies from Yoshi’s Island in order to cart mushrooms from Mario to Princess Peach. In Mario Bros., the player operates two persons at the end of multiple conveyer belts connected by ladders who’s purpose is to make sure that items being shipped out make it to the higher conveyer belt which, while in no way resembles the enemy flipping Mario Bros. arcade game, the player does get to use the Mario Brothers in modern mode to move the packages. In Donkey Kong Jr., which actually plays like its NES counterpart, the player takes the role of Donkey Kong Jr. who is on a quest to save Donkey Kong from the clutches of Mario who has captured and put into a cage. DK Jr. progresses through the level in order to find the key while avoiding enemies and eventually making it to his father’s cage. The classic mode is essentially the same, but is much harder due to increased enemy presence.

-Released December 1st, 1999

Okay, guys, I’m back! Sorry for the prolonged departure, but I’ve been on Spring Bread and having midterms; you know all that jazz. Anyway, tonight’s post is Game & Watch Gallery 2! This sequel to Game & Watch Gallery not only features further remakes of Game & Watch titles, but was also designed to be both reverse compatible with the Gameboy and to feature color palettes for use by the Gameboy Color to be accurate.
     This time, Game & Watch Gallery 2 features 5 games: Parachute, Helmet, Chef, Vermin, and Donkey Kong upfront and an unlockable game: Ball! In Parachute, the player operates a boat and attempts to catch characters being launched from an aircraft; per usual, three strikes you’re out! In Helmet, the player attempts to dodge flying debris being dropped down upon him from one doorway to the next building. This game’s board was featured as Flat Zone in Super Smash Bros. Melee. Next, in Chef, the player is a chef, as you might have guessed, and you attempt to keep the flying entrees afloat until it reaches either the cat (in classic) or Yoshi (in modern) so that they may eat them; hitting the floor is a miss here. In Vermin, the player attempts to prevent pests from reaching their goals by bashing them with a hammer, but should they may it past the threshold thrice, that’s a loss. Donkey Kong, as you may have guessed is a Game & Watch port of the original Donkey Kong game, but only the first level in repeat, unless you play the modern version which has multiple levels. Lastly, in Ball, the player attempts to keep multiple balls from reaching the ground by bouncing them in the air. If you happen to own a 3DS system, the music app also features the ability to play the game while listening to tunes.
-Released November 1st, 1998

Okay, guys, I’m back! Sorry for the prolonged departure, but I’ve been on Spring Bread and having midterms; you know all that jazz. Anyway, tonight’s post is Game & Watch Gallery 2! This sequel to Game & Watch Gallery not only features further remakes of Game & Watch titles, but was also designed to be both reverse compatible with the Gameboy and to feature color palettes for use by the Gameboy Color to be accurate.

     This time, Game & Watch Gallery 2 features 5 games: Parachute, Helmet, Chef, Vermin, and Donkey Kong upfront and an unlockable game: Ball! In Parachute, the player operates a boat and attempts to catch characters being launched from an aircraft; per usual, three strikes you’re out! In Helmet, the player attempts to dodge flying debris being dropped down upon him from one doorway to the next building. This game’s board was featured as Flat Zone in Super Smash Bros. Melee. Next, in Chef, the player is a chef, as you might have guessed, and you attempt to keep the flying entrees afloat until it reaches either the cat (in classic) or Yoshi (in modern) so that they may eat them; hitting the floor is a miss here. In Vermin, the player attempts to prevent pests from reaching their goals by bashing them with a hammer, but should they may it past the threshold thrice, that’s a loss. Donkey Kong, as you may have guessed is a Game & Watch port of the original Donkey Kong game, but only the first level in repeat, unless you play the modern version which has multiple levels. Lastly, in Ball, the player attempts to keep multiple balls from reaching the ground by bouncing them in the air. If you happen to own a 3DS system, the music app also features the ability to play the game while listening to tunes.

-Released November 1st, 1998

To be honest, I was totally unprepared for Gameboy postings. lol I hadn’t even had pictures of any of my Gameboy systems save for the original until tonight. Regardless, here are the pictures of the Gameboy Color models that I own, and soon I will post pictures of my Gameboy Pocket Models even though chronologically, I should have posted them just before the Pokemon posts.

     In order, they are Atomic Purple, Grape, Kiwi, Lime, and Teal, and are five of the original six launch colors available for the system. Dandelion, the yellow color system, I do not have yet, but am looking to buy one sometime in the near future. Fun Fact: All colors shown above and Dandelion, save for Atomic Purple are featured in the Gameboy Color logo shown at the bottom of the screen!

-Release Date: November 18th, 1998

RE: Fire Emblem

Who else thinks that Nintendo should create AND release outside of Japan a Fire Emblem Collection game like Kirby’s Dream Collection that chronicles the Famicom (NES) and Super Famicom (SNES) since none of them were released in America?

You would think that Nintendo of America, etc, would have thought to release them outside of Japan in some shape or form considering the success the series has had since 2003 when Fire Emblem for the Gameboy Advance was released. I know we got the remake of the original Fire Emblem Shadow Dragon for the DS, but none of the others have made their way to other shores. This is especially daunting when only 6/13 games have been outside of Japan. That’s like imagining The Legend of Zelda series without anything before The Minish Cap! Horrible, right?